click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20131028
20131105
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
beauty and harshness. schwartz: if you like a thrill, it's easy to fall for new zealand. steve latham: "kiwis love to bring people over here, show them their environment and try to scare... scare people to death while they're here" (laughs). ♪ schwartz: tour guide steve latham loves adventure. he's made a life out of it. steve latham: "i basically just left home when i was 17 and started hitchhiking around the country. learnt a lot about new zealand while i was doing that, then wanted to carry on with that and somehow make a living out of just being a new zealander, showing people how beautiful it was". schwartz: but new zealand has beauty with bite. too often in recent years, adventure has turned to deadly misadventure. queenslander, scott ashcroft is hoping that won't happen today. steve latham: "it's a very special day today isn't it? why is it a very special day? whose birthday is it? scotty's birthday! and one thing about scotty is that he's scared of heights - so as a birthday present we are going to throw him off a 134 metre bridge. what do we think of that idea?" tourists: (
for steve, he found quickly he had been kept in the dark of what was otherwise an open secret. here is a thing about a place like kansas things can hide in these wide open spaces. hopes, lies, secrets. the sky is like a huge lid trapping everything inside my name is steve, and i was born in kansas. i whats a i documente a adoptedy jane who raised me on this farm along with their six daughters and two sons. i grew up leaving thing believing things in my family were a certain way. but when you turned 18 i found out everything i thought i knew was a lie. ♪ testing. >> all right this is for real. >> tell us what you want to know? >> did you ever think that -- do you know do you have any regrets? >> no. >> do you think you handled everything the way you wanted to handle it? >> i would have liked to have done more for him. how do you feel? yeah how do you feel about us. >> i sort of block it out of my head. >> i think i was angry because i felt like i was left out. no, you weren't. >> you don't know what it's like to be adopted. >> no. >> so i do. and the sense of oh well i appreciate
cars will drive themselves. making the car the designated driver but for steve mayhem who is almost completely blind the cars will completely transform their lives lives. auto driving. google gave steve a look at the future. inviting him to take a seat in the first autonomous vehicle. >> look mom, no hands. >> how did that feel. >> incredibly normal. >> the car was driving did you have any instinct responses. >> we are here at the stop sign. anyone up for a taco. i suggest that we go to taco bell. >> this is somest best driving i have done. >> do you think you will be able to be driving again in your lifetime? >> absolutely. >> that sounds like lot of fun actually. and i'm feeling pett pretty good with this technology i think an automatic car will drive better. >> there is a lot of discussion about this whether they are safe or not. right now they're doing research that is basically taking a race car driver's skill and putting it inside of the scar. car. so if you hit black ice while you are driving you don't know what to do. imagine if you had the ewife equivalent of a race car dri
your biological parent. when that journey started for steve, he found quickly he had been kept in the dark of what was otherwise an open secret. here is a thing about a place like kansas things can hide in these wide open spaces. hopes, lies, secrets. the sky is like a huge lid trapping everything inside my name is steve, and i was born in kansas. i whats a i documente a adoptedy jane who raised me on this farm along with their six daughters and two sons. i grew up leaving thing believiy family were a certain way. but when you turned 18 i found out everything i thought i knew was a lie. ♪ >> testing one two. testing. >> all right this is for real. >> tell us what you want to know? >> did you ever think that -- do you know do you have any regrets? >> oh, no. >> no. >> do you think you handled everything the way you wanted to handle it? >> i would have liked to have done more for him. how do you feel? yeah how do you feel about us. >> i sort of block it out of my head. >> i think i was angry because i felt like i was left out. no, you weren't. >> you don't know what it's like
the line sometimes between consensual sex and rape. ♪ >>> it is safe to say that steve jobs changed the way all of us live with little devices like this. now a part of his childhood home is going to be preserved. now an historic site. the garage is where jobs and steve wozniak built some of the first apple computers. >>> after setting record highs yesterday, the stock market is pretty much flat about right now, investors marking time ahead of this afternoon's assessment for the fed. and flat is the operative word, down less than 3 points. >>> not much change in what we pay for things, retail inflation went up just .2 of a percent in april. they say consumer prices have risen just 1.2%. >>> and this is a sad story, apparently not enough wine around the world. morgan stanley saying supply isn't enough to keep up with the worldwide demand. it is short by about 300 million cases this year. bad weather is to blame. >>> casual relationships or what students call hooking up seem to be common on college campuses. casey coffman takes us to kansas university where students take a break from their stu
. >>> steve jobs changed every's lives with this thing called the ipad. now his childhood is going to be preserve. this home where he grew up is now in a storage site. the garage is where steve jobs built some of the first apple computers. >>> take a look at these images. while talking to thousands at st. peter's square pope francis made a new friend. the little boy sat in the chair and just wouldn't move. an aid tried to get the little boy off the stage, but it didn't work. instead the boy wrapped his arms around the pope, and the pope didn't mind. at one point he had--there you go. >>> some how i think his parents are going to remember that for a long time. up next on al jazeera america. >> it is reported that at 8:50 a meteorite fell on a farm in new jersey. >> it was all make believe but the anniversary of the war of the world broadcast is just as real as it has ever been. >> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm del walters. these are your headlines. for three hours lawmakers grilled health and human secretary kathleen sebelius for website healthcare.gov . sebelius promised
for market cheaters, e-mails indicating the top executives including it's founders steve cohen failed to stop alleged insider training. six employees have pleaded guilty to insider training and one is serving two and a half years in prison. two other men are set to stand trial. now stephen cohen has not been charged with criminal activity, but the journal said he'll remain under investigation. ali? >> a lot of people may not know of sc capital visors or stephen cohen. it's been in the news but for a lot of people who follow business. this firm is a pretty big deal. >> absolutely. this hedge fund was the envy of wall street. it had $50 billion in assets under management and posts outside trading profits for two decades but since it has fallen in fed crosshairs clients have pulled most of their money but stephen cohen still has a sizable fortune to manage at $9.2 billion. >> he alone has more money than many hedge funds will manage. so the agreement just means that they can't manage outside money. >> we've seen this so much, and we heard time and time again that ultimately it's not the money th
bee keepers like steve ellis. we have reached the disaster point from bee keeping industry standpoint. it needs to be understood by the keep in the country that we have a deepwater horizon occurring with pollinators, and we need to deal with it. >> when you talk about scientists trying to influence evolution, how effective can we really be? >> you can look around you. you see how effective we can be when we artificially inseminate something. we did it with dogs. we are looking at the traits that make successful bees successful and select those and bring them into a muddled population in america. >> worse case scenario all the bees disappear. >> mayby tiny robotic drones. >> i like the robotic bee idea. some researchers at harvard are working on this. environment. >> science is not all like that. you always have to attack fronts. >> speaking of insects you've been doing fun stuff in the amazon. what will we see. >> a trick we played on jaguars, and a neat spider we found. >> we want to hear what you think about the stories. join the conversation. (vo) al jazeera america we understand
is steve thompson on central michigan university who is a sexual aggression services coordinator. you watch these things on all campuses. it really isn't just occidental or any particular campus. it's happening everywhere. >> absolutely. it's not unique to that campus but all campuses in our culture. they say approximately 1 in 4 women will be the victim of a sexual assault sometime in their life. even in college or walking around washington, d.c. women are preyed on as well. >> why, when a university is clear, when they have expelled a student and where they believe answer individual was an tacker. you heard these new women who knew they're assailant has attacked another woman. why don't they act more quickly? wouldn't they want to act quickly to remove somebody from campus? >> one would think so. academia is behind the times a lot. i think they still follow this base, well, they were drinking. it's miscommunication. they don't realize that individuals that prey upon people they know, it's a planned act. it's a planned act of power and control. they know where they're going to do. they kno
struck down. >> why the case is headed to the supreme court for a second time. >> apple creator steve jobs made history in this house. >> what's now being done to cement that contribution. there's the house right there, in american culture. >> there seems to be no stopping the bulls on wall street. why the stock market could set new record highs again today. >> welcome back. another state's attempt to limit abortions might fail its final legal test. oklahoma's top court ruled two years ago that a restrictive abortion law was unconstitutional. they say now it includes all drug induced abortions. a clarification was made for the supreme court and federal justices are unlikely to back the law. a texas abortion law was struck down earlier this week. >> the f.c.c. has a new leader. the senate confirmed tom wheeler to serve as chairman. the seat had been empty for months. his appointment was stalled by senator ted cruz. the texas senator wanted to be sure he did not tighten the rule for ads. >> the federal reserve makes a big announcement today. >> we have the latest headlines. >> the two d
are the ethics involved? dr. steve horvath is a professor of human genetics at ucla. he joins us from los angeles. dr. art kaplan is a bioeth cyst. he is the head of the nyulangon medical elth ifex division. dr. harvath, i want to speak with you. you have spoken about a fountain of youth since ponce de leon went searching. we know you studied 8,000 samples of more than 4,000 cancerous cells and tissues. give us a shot in layman's terms here what exactly did you find? >> well, i found a biological clock that allows one to estimate the ages of many tissues and cell types in organs in the human body. and this new aging clock is based on certain markers on the dna, and by averaging these 353 markers, one can arrive at a highly accurate estimate of human age. >> so you can actually see what the dna, what age the dna should have. you can see where some were older and some were younger? >> yes. exactly. this is, of course, a very interesting application to estimate the age of various different regions from the same individual and then identify certain tissues or organs that either look substantially old
and panties and soup kitchens will face further strain. >>> joining me now is steve coen, really appreciate your time tonight, congressman your state is very dependant on food stamps. one in five residents is receiving food stamps. here we're showing a graphic that shows how california is losing $457 million as a result of this. of course they have a much larger population than tennessee, tennessee is losing $141 million. how much of an impact will this have on your state? >> it will be considerable in a state -- of course i'm most concerned about my district which is most of memphis. memphis is the poorest metropolitan region in the nation. so the cuts will have a very, very strong effect. snap payments were originally raised not only out of concern for the people who lost their jobs or got less pay because of the bush recession, the recession we're still in, but it has -- a stimulus effect because all of that money is spent, and it goes into grocers and people that produce the food, that ship the food and gets in the economy and helps the economy in general. it is going to hurt memphis an
to be aggressive with their product. it is a post steve jobs era and they need to figure out their game plan in order to kind of stimulate that fast growth that they once enjoyed in the jobs era. >> for this year, apple stock is actually down about a%. >> the effect of the government shut down are making economists less optimistic about u.s. growth. 63% believe the dysfunction in washington is hurting the economy. you could be one of millions of americans who have a loft retirement account, money that belongs to you collecting dust in a plan you may not know exist. we speak with a 401k hunter, a man contracted by the government to find you. he says when he calls people, he often gets the strangest reactions. >> they pretty much just say, you know, some choice four letter words. i'm like no, we really have money for you. >> that's real money. find out if one of these accounts could belong to you, tonight on real money with ali velshi. >> i will give you my social security number now. how much money are we talking about being lost? >> billions of dollars, these sleep lie accounts you may not k
in manhattan are prepared to announce a deal dade. the steve run by steven a. cohen is expected to pay more than a billion dollars in criminal penalties, the largest ever for an insider trading case. also will plead guilty to insider trading. it has been one of the most popular hedge funds for decades. >> what is a small town in southern california have to do with towns in greece, costa rica and italy. they are known to have the healthiest people in the world. what makes them so special? we went to the only blue zone in the u.s. to find out. >> 60 miles east of downtown los angeles, you'll find loma linda, a university town in a blue zone, one of five places around the world where people live measurably longer, healthier lives. >> i'm 99 years old. >> the day we met ellsworth, we found him mowing his lawn and tending his garden. what's more remarkable, just four years ago, he retired from a long, successful career as a heart surgeon. >> as long as your hands are steady and eyes good, why, you can do it. i could do cardiac surgery right now. >> then with he met 84-year-old jim anderson exerc
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)